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William & Mary Social Cognition Lab

Our research deals with social cognition; more specifically, we are interested in stereotyping and prejudice. In the lab, we study race, gender, and sexual orientation from a variety of angles. On one hand, we examine the initial stereotypes that automatically come to mind when you see an individual belonging to certain social group (e.g., race, gender, etc.). On the other hand, we examine how people respond to individuals making prejudicial remarks. Our research employs a variety of research methods, including behavioral measures, EEG techniques, and self-report. 

If you are interested in becoming a research assistant in the lab, complete the following application: Research Assistant application and return it to my mailbox in the psychology department or email me at cldickter@wm.edu

 


Current Researchers:

 

Mikaela Spruill

Senior Honors Student

Mikaela Spruill

Project Description:

The United States of America’s social history has been defined by inclusion and exclusion along racial lines. In recent years however, a shift in the structure of power has occurred as a new generation of affluent African Americans has risen to form the new Black middle and upper class (Landry & Marsh, 2011). This newfound social mobility may induce an inverse relationship in which an individual’s feelings of connectedness to their in-group decreases as stature within a highly regarded out-group increases. Research in this specific area of investigation has been limited to solely analyzing intergroup sentiments along a Black-White binary. Major texts such as Jones’ (1997) Prejudice and Racism and Allport’s (1954) The Nature of Prejudice have analyzed the integral relationship between race and social class in the foundation of White’s construction of their judgments of Blacks. In order to add depth to this topic, we will assess intragroup attitudes, specifically in the Black community.  In this study, we hope to analyze the implications of this relationship by examining how African Americans that identify as middle and upper class perceive others that identify as lower and working class. In order to do this, experiments will be conducted which will consist of a preference task, a reaction paradigm and several surveys on a large inclusive group of Black participants. By examining a major social construct within a group whose status is constantly under threat we hope to shed more light on the idea of in-group bias and reveal the implicit views of socially mobile minorities.

 


Emily Jarnagin



Emily Jarnagin

Class of 2016

4 Semesters





Yuchen Wang



Yuchen Wang

Class of 2018

1 Semester

 

 

 

 

Julie Rodil



Julie Rodil

Class of 2018

2 Semesters

 

 

 

 

Malarie Gamblin

 




Malarie Gamblin

Class of 2018

1 Semester

 

 

 

Nathanael Paige




Nathanael Paige

Class of 2018

1 Semester

 

 

 

 Manaswitha Thota


Maniswitha Thota

Class of 2019

1 Semester