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Past WISE Grant Awardees

WISE is proud to award $50,000 in grants annually to female faculty working in the STEM disciplines at The College of William and Mary, Richard Bland College, and Thomas Nelson Community College.

 

WISE is pleased to announce its April 2014 grant awardees:

 

Inter-Institutional Collaborative Grants:

 

Jennifer Martin, Biology & Oceanography, TNCC

            Coding Characters for Cladistic Analysis: an Example from the Lampridiformes"  

co-PI Eric Hilton, Fisheries, VIMS

 

Lynsey LeMay, Geology, TNCC

            Salt marsh response to sea level change

co-PI Matthew Kirwan, Physical Sciences, VIMS

 

Elena Kuchina, Physics, TNCC

            Atom-based Vector Magnetometry

co-PI Irina Novikova, Physics W&M

 

 

Summer Research Grants:

 

Katie Schultz, Economics, W&M

            The effects of participation in high school sports on Academic, Labor Market and

Health Outcomes

 

Anya Lunden, English and Linguistics, W&M

            Perception of Rhythmic Patterns and their Relation to Stress Typology

 

 

Teaching Resources Grant:

 

Riham Mahfouz, Chemistry, TNCC

            Implementing iPads into the General and Organic Chemistry Curriculum at TNCC

 

 

Travel awards:

 

Ann Bunger, English and Linguistics, W&M, 13th International Congress for the Study of Child Language, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 

Sarah Finch, Biology, TNCC, International Conference on College Teaching and Learning, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL

 

Jennifer Kahn, Anthropology, W&M, Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX

 

Michelle Lelievre, Anthropology and American Studies, W&M, Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX

 

Riham Mahfouz, Chemistry, TNCC, cCWCS “Active Learning in Organic Chemistry” workshop, Denver, CO

 

Joanna Schug, Psychology, W&M, International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, Reims, France

 

Rochelle Seitz, Biological Sciences, VIMS, ICES Working group on “The Value of Coastal Habitats for Exploited Species,” Lisbon, Portugal

 

Jaime Settle, Government, W&M, International Society of Political Psychology, Rome, Italy

 

Elizabeth Yost, Sociology, W&M, Southern Sociological Society, Charlotte, NC

WISE Grant Awardees (December, 2013)

Seed grants were awarded to:

Barbara Morgan, Associate Professor of Psychology (Richard Bland College) for her project Equine-assisted stress management.

Joanna Schug, Assistant Professor of Psychology (William & Mary) for her project An examination of gene and culture interactions in trust behavior.

Rochelle Seitz, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences (VIMS) for her project Ocean acidification: Quantitative effects on predator-prey interactions.

Jan McDowell, Research Assistant Professor of Fisheries (VIMS) for her project Generation of a reduced representation library for de novo SNP discovery.

Teaching resources grants were awarded to:

Riham Mahfouz, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (TNCC) for enhancements to CHM 101 and 112 laboratories.

Lucinda Spryn, Instructor in Chemistry (TNCC) for enhancements to CHM 102 and 245 laboratories.

Travel grants were awarded to:

Donna Bilkovic, Research Assistant Professor in the Center for Coastal Resources Management (VIMS) to attend the National Shellfisheries Association annual meeting in Jacksonville, FL.

Inga Carboni, Assistant Professor in the Mason School of Business (William & Mary) to attend the Intra Organizational Networks (ION) conference in Lexington, KY.

Elena Kuchina, Assistant Professor of Physics (TNCC) to attend a spring teaching workshop on “Infusing Learner-Centered Strategies Into Your Course” to be held in Austin, TX.

Jennifer Martin, Associate Professor of Biology & Oceanography (TNCC) to attend the Ocean Sciences meeting in Honolulu, HI.

Sharon Cotman, Professor of Information Systems Technology (TNCC) to attend the 19th Technology Computing Conference in Nashville, TN.

Other Past Awards Include:

Donna Bilkovic, Research Assistant Professor, Center for Coastal Resources, Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)

Project title: Composition, distribution, and dynamics of intertidal epibiota on coastal defense structures.

Description: Proliferation of artificial structures including bulkheads, seawalls, rock revetments and offshore breakwaters to protect shorelines has introduced novel habitat to most coastal environments and fragmented natural habitats. These changes can result in disrupted connectivity, habitat homogenization, and altered estuarine landscapes, with uncertain implications for estuarine and marine faunal community structure and function. In those estuaries, such as Chesapeake Bay, where soft-bottom habitat dominates and rocky shorelines are rare, the introduction of artificial rocky structure may enhance recruitment of species that are limited by the availability of suitable substrate including native and introduced species. There is a significant lack of empirical data on the types of epibiotic assemblages (e.g., mussels, barnacles) that colonize artificial structures in Chesapeake Bay. This research will evaluate the seasonal changes of epibiota and abundance and the prevalence of non-native species on offshore breakwaters. Long-term research goals are to understand the implications of hardening coastlines on the distribution and composition of estuarine and marine species.

Danielle Dallaire, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, W&M

Project title: The protective effects of emotional competencies on children with incarcerated mothers: A longitudinal study.

Description: Previous research has shown that the multifaceted risk of maternal incarceration is associated with a number of poor social, emotional and behavioral problems in children, however few studies have examined protective factors that may mitigate the significant risks these children face. Our recently completed federally funded research project (NIH R21 mechanism) is the largest purposefully planned study of this population and has examined emotional competencies as individual protective factors in children aged 7 - 12 whose mother is incarcerated. Funds from the WISE grant will support a follow-up, longitudinal study with this sample and the preparation of an R01 grant submission to the NIH for further longitudinal study of these children as they transition into adolescence.

Amy Quark, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, William & Mary, was awarded a Seed grant for her project Entrepreneurial Standard-Setting and Democratic Accountability in the Global Economy

This multi-sited, qualitative research project explores the global harmonization of consumer health and safety standards. As our food increasingly crisscrosses the globe before landing on our plates, highly publicized food scares have given rise to new questions regarding the health and safety risks posed by the globalization of commodity production and distribution. Yet, who decides what globally harmonized standards should be? This research explores this question through a comparative study of food scares in India and China. This study will shed light on how different resources, transnational relationships, national institutions, cultural orientations, and scientific research legacies influence actors’ abilities to participate in international standards-setting.

Joanna Schug, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology, William & Mary, was awarded a seed grant for her project A cross-cultural examination of OXTR polymorphisms and Trust Behavior

While previous studies have found an association between interpersonal trusting behavior and variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), thus far no study has examined whether this association holds true in non-Western samples. The inclusion of non-Western samples in studies linking genetic variance with behavior is especially important as a number of recent studies have found that culture can moderate the impact of genes on behavior--genes can often predict opposite behavioral tendencies in individuals from different cultural backgrounds. This study will be part of a larger cross-cultural project examining the impact of OXTR polymorphism on trusting behavior in two cultures: Japan and the United States.

 

Sarah Glaser (W&M Biology Department and VIMS Department of Fisheries) was awarded a Summer Research Grant for her project Fisheries in the Lake Victoria Basin: Links between Fish Catch and Market Price.

Summary: The fisheries in Lake Victoria are an important part of the economy, culture, environment, and food security of millions of people who live around the Lake. This summer, I will travel to Uganda to explore the relationships between fish abundance in the Lake, fishing catch and effort, and the price of fish and other food commodities in regional markets. In collaboration with researchers at the National Fisheries Resources Research Institute in Jinja, William and Mary professor Cullen Hendrix, and three W&M students, our research seeks to explain how changes in fishing effort may be related to changes in market price for fish and other food commodities in nearby markets. We will also explore how changes in catch (that is, how successful fishing is in a given year) affect local eating habits. The results of this study will improve our understanding of the complex feedbacks inherent in coupled human-natural systems and will have implications for the management and conservation of Lake Victoria fisheries.

 

Jennifer Martin (TNCC Department of Biology and Oceanography) was awarded a Summer Research Grant for her project Evolution and Global Biogeography of Lampridiform Fishes.

 

Elizabeth Harbron (W&M Chemistry Department) was awarded a Transition Grant for her project New Fluorescent pH Sensors.

Summary: The acidity of water, as characterized by its pH, is profoundly important to the functioning of environmental and biological systems. While many excellent analytical methods for measuring pH exist, samples in which the pH is heterogeneous with regard to time and/or a spatial domain remain challenging for pH quantification. My lab proposes a family of fluorescent pH sensors in which the color of fluorescence will undergo a substantial change over a predefined pH range. By measuring the ratio of color components (e.g. green:red), we will be able to pinpoint the pH and monitor its fluctuations over time and across spatial domains in imaging experiments.

 

Meghan Sinton (W&M Psychology Department) was awarded a Seed Grant for her project Cognitive Dissonance Approach to Reducing Body Image and Associated Psychosocial Problems in College Women.

Summary: This study examines the influence of a cognitive dissonance body dissatisfaction prevention program on a range of health and developmental outcomes in college women. This study extends previous work, which has established this program to be highly effective for the prevention of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in college women, to consider if and how this program influences a broader range of outcomes that are associated with disordered eating symptoms. More specifically, this study will examine if women who receive the cognitive dissonance program will, compared to women in an active control group, experience greater increases in feelings of self-worth and memory recall and greater decreases in risky health behaviors and problems with emotion regulation. Findings may have implications for understanding mechanisms that underlie change in risk for disordered eating in women over time.

Donna Bilkovic (VIMS Center for Coastal Resources Management) was awarded a Seed Grant for her project Ecological Trade-Offs of Living Shoreline Erosion Control Approaches.

Summary: Armoring shorelines to prevent erosion is a long-standing global practice that has well-documented adverse effects on coastal habitats and associated organisms. A relatively new form of natural shoreline protection that incorporates created marsh, referred to as living shorelines, has been theorized to not only control erosion but also to restore coastal habitat. This research will evaluate whether living shorelines provide comparable ecosystem functions as natural shorelines and identify the ecological tradeoffs of converting existing habitat to living shorelines. Long-term research goals are to assess whether living shorelines can be an effective form of coastal habitat restoration that contributes to improved water and habitat quality of the greater estuary.

 

Shanti Morell-Hart (W&M Anthropology Department) was awarded a Seed Grant for her project Archaeological Survey of Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Rochelle Seitz (VIMS Department of Biological Sciences) was awarded a Seed Grant for her project Predator-Prey Dynamics and Evolutionary Defense Tactics in Marine Bivalves.

 

Travel awards:

Hannah Anderson-Hughes, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, TNCC. Travel to: Passion, Purpose and Potency conference in Buckinghamshire, England.

Irina Novikova, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, W&M: Travel to: Quantum Optics VI in Piriápolis, Uruguay.

Joanna Schug, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, W&M: Travel to: Society for Personality and Social Psychology in New Orleans, LA

Rochelle Seitz (VIMS Department of Biological Sciences) was awarded a Travel Grant to support her attendance at a workshop for assessing the “Value of Coastal Habitats for Exploited Species” to be held in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Jennifer Martin (TNCC Department of Biology and Oceanography) was awarded a Travel Grant to support her attendance at the Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries conference to be held in Split and Hvar, Croatia.

Riham Mahfouz (TNCC Chemistry Department) was awarded a Travel Grant to support her attendance at the 2012 Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, to be held at Penn State University.

Jan McDowell (VIMS Department of Fisheries) was awarded a Travel Grant to support her visit to the Large Pelagics Research Center in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Hazel Ruff (TNCC Nursing Department) was awarded a Travel Grant to support her attendance at the National Nurse Practitioner Symposium to be held in Copper Mountain, Colorado.

Sarah Glaser, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology, William & Mary, to attend the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Minneapolis, MN.

Shanti Morell-Hart, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, William & Mary, to attend the World Archaeological Congress held in Dead Sea, Jordan

Helen Murphy, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology, William & Mary, to attend the Fleshy Fungi of the Highlands Plateau course held in Highlands, NC

Hazel Ruff, Assistant Professor in the Department of Nursing, Thomas Nelson Community College, to attend the Centennial Nurse Educator Conference in Breckenridge, CO

Rochelle Seitz, Research Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, to attend the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Minneapolis, MN

avel awards:

 

Hannah Anderson-Hughes, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, TNCC. Travel to: Passion, Purpose and Potency conference in Buckinghamshire, England.

Irina Novikova, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, W&M: Travel to: Quantum Optics VI in Piriápolis, Uruguay.

Joanna Schug, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, W&M: Travel to: Society for Personality and Social Psychology in New Orleans, LA